Video

Aspirin: The "Swiss Army Knife" of Baldness Remedies?

00:00 - Introduction

01:47 - Brain Atrophy in Androgenic Alopecia? (My New Theory) https://youtu.be/956IF0oDfZY

02:12 - Ata Korkmaz HA. Relationship between androgenic alopecia and white matter hyperintensities in apparently healthy subjects. Brain Imaging Behav. 2019 Jun 27. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31250269

03:30 - "Estrogen, hyperventilation, lactate, etc., increase serotonin, and I think it’s serotonin that directly increases PTH, and then PTH increases NO.” Raymond Peat, Ph.D. (2017)

03:59 - The relationship between insulin resistance, arterial stiffness, hypertension, baldness, and white matter hyperintensities

06:26 - "Surgeons will say many things to get customers, but one website promoting removal of enlarged parathyroid glands makes the interesting comment that they see an average of three women per day who are going bald from hyperparathyroidism. 'The longer they have hyperparathyroidism the more hair they lose.'" Adaptogenic Milk by Raymond Peat, Ph.D. (2017)

06:57 - Aspirin might help reverse white matter hyperintensities, and opposes, estrogen, hyperventilation, lactic acid, serotonin, parathyroid hormone, cortisol, aldosterone, and nitric oxide.

08:46 - "The highest activity a human being can attain is learning for understanding, because to understand is to be free." Spinoza

09:52 - Aspirin caveats: vitamin K, dissolving the aspirin with baking soda, and using alongside a meal.

6 Things I Wish I Knew About Ray Peat Inspired Nutrition

00:00 - Introduction: How I Got to Ray Peat

01:07 - Part I: Collect Self-Metrics & Find The Best Information Available

02:53 - Part II: Antibiotic Foods, Sporebiotics & Safe Pharma Antibiotics

05:31 - Part III: Source Sweet Juicy Fruits & Avoid Tart, Sour & Unripe Rruits

07:34 - Part IV: Adopting a Judicious Attitude Towards Supplements

09:12 - Part V: The Irreplaceable Value of Ruminant Liver & Oysters

10:51 - Part VI: Learning to Cook is a Necessary Skill

What is Health? Comparing Zero-Carb, Vegan & Bioenergetic Models

00:00 - Introduction

00:46 - Part I: The Starting Orientation for Vegans, Carnivores & Bioenergetic Advocates

05:17 - Part II: Raymond Pearl's Rate of Living Theory, Carbs, NEFA, Fasting & Cold Exposure

08:18 - Part III: Hans Selye's Stress in Context

08:58 - Part IV: PUFA - A Ubiquitous Environmental Stressor That Is Stored In Your Tissues

10:53 - Part V: Carbon Dioxide - An "Essential Vitamin"

12:41 - Part VI: Thoughts on "Health" & Resisting The Rigidity of Aging

Why I Quit The Zero-Carb Carnivore Diet After 2-Years

00:00 - My History with Zero-Carb

01:50 - Negative Symptoms I Experienced (e.g., Mood, Libido, Outlook, etc.)

02:30 - My Experience with The Zero-Carb Community

04:08 - Why I Suspect My Health Initially Improved

05:25 - Why I Suspect Zero-Carb Causes Hypometabolism (i.e., Metabolic Stress)

06:30 - Stress Can Cause Short-Term Euphoria

07:58 - Cholesterol as a Mirror Image of Thyroid Function

09:35 - Phosphorous, Calcium & PTH

Reversing Fibrosis in Male Pattern Baldness (Apigenin, Naringenin, Aspirin, and Gelatin)

Inflammation is an umbrella concept in pattern baldness that is given little attention in the mainstream. Polyunsaturated fats, mast cell migration and activation, prostaglandins, inflammatory cytokines, and the fibrotic environment these substances promote all appear to be involved in the progression of "the baldness field." Luckily, simple, safe, and available substances such as apigenin, naringenin, aspirin, and gelatin can help guard against the harmful effects of these inflammatory substances and in some cases help restore coherence to fibrotic tissues.

00:57 - Mitochondria, Oxidative Stress, and Fibrosis
03:03 - TGF-b1 and Fibrosis in The Bald Scalp
03:55 - Will a "Single Bullet" Approach Work?
04:49 - Fibrosis, Thyroid Function, Progesterone, and Helpful Foods
05:44 - Apigenin
06:44 - Naringenin
07:43 - Aspirin
08:57 - Gelatin


 

The Misunderstood Role of DHT in Male Pattern Baldness

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01:59 - Testosterone, 5-Alpha Reductase, and DHT in Normal Hair Growth
04:20 - The Relationship Between Serum Androgens and Baldness
06:17 - The Relationship Between 5-Alpha Reductase and Androgens in The Balding Scalp
12:53 - Summary

Specialized Nutrition for Male Pattern Baldness

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Carbon Dioxide: The "Cure" for Male Pattern Baldness?

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Since producing 'Explaining The "Horseshoe" Shape of Male Pattern Baldness' I've been receiving a lot of questions about scalp massage and microneedling as potential therapies to increase blood flow and the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to balding hair follicles. While I don't think a relaxing massage would hurt, I'm extremely skeptical of microneedling as it seems to fall under the cut, burn, poison model of modern medicine. This video is an attempt at shifting the conversation away from methods that are as old as baldness itself, and towards a bioenergetic view of pattern hair loss with an emphasis on carbon dioxide.

The "Personality" of Male Pattern Baldness (Learned Helplessness)

“In many [pattern baldness patients], we encountered various types of ‘fixed smiles,’ and in a few, a rather striking, characteristic expression best described as a ‘toothy smile.’ Such rigid facial patterns are thought to reflect, psychologically speaking, defensive attitudes. Wilhelm Reich in his book, ‘Character Analysis,’ pointed out what he called ‘muscular armor’ as a frequently observed somatic reflection of ‘character armor.’ ‘Character armor’ refers to the psychologic defenses of a neurotic personality which serve as protection from feelings of insecurity and anxiety.”[1]

“Adaptive hormones can cause mental changes in man. Many patients who take ACTH or COL first develop a sense of extraordinary wellbeing and buoyancy, with excitement and insomnia; this is sometimes followed by a depression which may go so far as to create suicidal tendencies.”[2]

“Glucocorticoids exert early influences on the brain that tend to elevate mood and increase the sense of ‘well-being.’ Larger amounts can bring on temporary euphoria. However, the secondary effects include psychic depression. Patients with chronically elevated levels tend to have mood swings. They have been known to display bizarre behavior and to suffer hallucinations.”[3]

“Hyperprolactinemic patients were significantly more hostile, depressed, and anxious and had more feelings of inadequacy than family practice patients and non patient employees. The authors recommend measuring the serum prolactin levels of women with depression, hostility, anxiety, and symptoms or signs suggestive of hyperprolactinemia.”[4]

“Negative affectivity is a broad personality trait that refers to the stable tendency to experience negative emotions. Individuals who are high in negative affectivity are more likely to report negative affective mood states across time and regardless of the situation.”[5]

“High-negative affectivity individuals not only experience more feelings of dysphoria and tension, but have a negative view of self, report more somatic symptoms, and have an attention bias towards adverse stimuli. Overall, they seem to scan the world for signs of impending trouble…”[6]

“A common denominator among these studies documenting increased cortisol to laboratory challenges appears to be an increase in negative affectivity. The relationship between negative affectivity and cortisol activity has been well documented in several studies using structured laboratory stressors, such as public speaking and mental arithmetic and aversive stimulation as well as in the psychiatric literature relating to alterations in cortisol in depressed patients.”[7]

“Closely related to this openness to inner and outer experience in general is an openness to and an acceptance of other individuals. As a client moves toward being able to accept his own experience, he also moves toward the acceptance of the experience of others. He values and appreciates both his own experience and that of others for what it is. To quote Maslow again regarding his self-actualizing individuals: ‘One does not complain about water because it is wet, nor about rocks because they are hard… As the child looks out upon the world with wide, uncritical and innocent eyes, simply noting and observing what is the case, without either arguing the matter or demanding that it be otherwise, so does the self-actualizing person look upon human nature both in himself and in others.’ This acceptant attitude toward that which exists, I find developing in clients in therapy.”[8]  

“Making an effort to learn how to use techniques of food, hormones, light, activity, etc., is similar to the effort needed to work with a psychologist, and the effort itself is part of the therapy…”[9]

1. A theory of the pathogenesis of ordinary human baldness (1950)
2. The Story of Adaptation Syndrome (1952)
3. Endocrine Physiology (1985)
4. Hyperprolactinemia, distress, and hostility (1984)
5. Encyclopedia of Behavioral Medicine Negative Affectivity (2013)
6. Type D personality: A potential risk factor refined (2000)
7. Cortisol fluctuates with increases and decreases in negative affect (1999)
8. Carl Rogers on Abraham Maslow in the book, On Becoming a Person (1961)
9. Raymond Peat (2014)

Explaining The "Horseshoe" Shape of Male Pattern Baldness

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“The role of mast cells in male-pattern baldness is unknown, but the large numbers often present is a striking feature.”[1] 

"We postulate that because of the underlying anatomy, there is a relative microvascular insufficiency to regions of the scalp that lose hair in male pattern baldness and that is associated with local tissue hypoxia in those regions. The vascular supply of the scalp is derived from branches of the internal carotid artery and branches of the external carotid artery. The frontal region of the scalp, which loses hair in male pattern baldness, is supplied by the supraorbital and the supratrochlear arteries. These are relatively small branches of the internal carotid artery system. The temporal [sides] and occipital [back of head] regions of the scalp, which do not lose hair in male pattern baldness, are supplied by larger branches of the external carotid artery. Specifically, these are the superficial temporal, posterior auricular, and occipital arteries. Further, the frontal and vertex regions of the scalp overlie the galea aponeurotica, which is relatively avascular. The temporal and occipital regions of the scalp overlie the temporalis and occipitalis muscles, which provide a rich network of musculocutaneous perforator blood vessels. These anatomic differences contribute to the tenuous nature of the dermal blood supply to the frontal and crown regions of the scalp."[2]

"We hypothesized that this difference in pattern of prostaglandin D-synthase expression may constitute a developmental pattern inherent to normal as well as alopecic scalp skin, thus defining a ‘field’ vulnerable to acquired hair loss." “These data indicate that scalp is spatially programmed via mast cell prostaglandin D-synthase distribution in a manner reminiscent of the pattern seen in androgenetic alopecia.” "In a prior study of male pattern alopecia, increased numbers of mast cells have been seen in balding vertices compared to non-balding occipital scalp and, in fact, this pattern was also observed in five control subjects studied, though there were greater numbers of mast cells in the patients with alopecia.” "In the 1990’s mast cells were found to be actively degranulating in the inflammatory infiltrates of scalp with male pattern alopecia and this was proposed to contribute to perifollicular fibrosis.”[3] 

"Mast cells express the high-affinity estrogen receptor and studies have shown that estrogens augment their activities: in the presence of high levels of estrogens, mast cell responses to compound 48/80 are increased, leading to more substantial degranulation and release of histamine and serotonin.” "Progesterone is necessary for the maintenance of pregnancy and plays a key role in maintaining cervical integrity prior to labour induction. Progesterone can prevent the migration of mast cells in response to chemokines and down-regulate surface chemokine receptor expression. In addition, mast cell function can be altered by the presence of high concentrations of progesterone. For example, progesterone inhibits the secretion of histamine from mast cells. Notably, these observations would suggest that mast cells present within the uterus during pregnancy are quiescent and inhibited by high levels of progesterone, and also that recruitment of mast cell progenitors from the circulation may be limited.” "At present the prevalence of allergies, including allergic rhinitis, hayfever, eczema, food allergies and urticaria, is rising." [4]

"Results from this study provide the first evidence of a unique regulatory mechanism by which CO2 inhibits mast cell degranulation and histamine release by repressing stimulated increases in intracellular calcium. Thus, our data provide a plausible explanation for the reported therapeutic benefit of noninhaled intranasal delivery of 100% CO2 to treat allergic rhinitis." [5]

1. Male pattern alopecia a histopathologic and histochemical study (1975) 
2. Transcutaneous PO2 of the scalp in male pattern baldness: a new piece to the puzzle (1996)
3. A prostaglandin D-synthase-positive mast cell gradient characterizes scalp patterning (2014) 
4. The role of mast cells and their mediators in reproduction, pregnancy and labour (2010) 
5. Treatment of mast cells with carbon dioxide suppresses degranulation via a novel mechanism involving repression of increased intracellular calcium levels (2011)

Male Pattern Baldness: Hypothyroidism in Disguise?

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Do The "Essential Fatty Acids" Cause Pattern Hair Loss?

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“All members of this group [prostaglandins] are synthesized from ‘polyunsaturated’ fatty acids that must be supplied by the diet. From a quantitative standpoint, arachidonic acid is the major precursor.” “Meats and peanuts contain small amounts [of arachidonic acid], but the liver forms most of it from linoleic acid. Arachidonic acid is the precursor of the prostaglandins with two double bonds, and of the several other biologically potent substances."[1] 

"These results define PGD2 as an inhibitor of hair growth in male-pattern baldness and suggest the PGD2-GPR44 pathway as a potential target for treatment.”[2] 

"EFA deficiency has been shown to exert an anti­inflammatory effect."[3] 

"In summary, the anti-inflammatory effect of EFA deficiency was more marked that that of dietary (n-3) fatty acid supplementation in acute inflammation."[4]

1. Endocrine Physiology by Constance R. Martin (1985)
2. Prostaglandin d2 inhibits hair growth and is elevated in bald scalp of men with androgenetic alopecia (2012)
3. Essential fatty acid deficiency: a new look at an old problem (1986)
4. Manipulation of the acute inflammatory response by dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid modulation (1990)

Higher Prolactin in Pattern Baldness?

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"A conclusion has been made that one of the most important mechanisms of the adaptive effect of prolactin is its ability to suppress thyroid function, thus decreasing the metabolism level, which results in reduction of oxygen consumption…"[1]

"Subsequent actions of prolactin may involve the following: a) an increased intracellular concentration of potassium and a reduced level of sodium, b) an increased level of cGMP and a reduced level of cAMP, c) an enhanced rate of prostaglandin biosynthesis mediated by a stimulation of phospholipase A2 activity, and d) a stimulation of polyamine synthesis."[2]

"...serum prolactin concentrations reflect endogenous serotonin..." "...aromatase activity correlated significantly with prolactin..."[3]
 
"After glucose load the hyperprolactinaemic patients showed a decrease in glucose tolerance and a hyperinsulinaemia." "These findings suggest a diabetogenic effect of prolactin."[4]

"These observations indicate that cutaneous symptoms such as seborrhea, acne, hypertrichosis/hirsutism, alopecia may evidently occur in hyperprolactinemia, representing or mimicking androgen-induced skin symptoms. In such cases, therefore, evaluation of prolactin levels together with androgen blood levels and thyroid gland function tests should be performed to exclude underlying endocrinopathy."[5]

1. Metabolism of thyroid gland cells as affected by prolactin and emotional-physical stress (1991)
2. Mechanism of prolactin action (1980)
3. Effects of aromatase inhibition and androgen activity on serotonin and behavior in male macaques (2013)
4. Prolactin: a diabetogenic hormone (1977)
5. Disorder of hair growth in hyperprolactinemia (1988)